Supportive Care

140 Hospital Drive, Bennington, VT 05201
(802) 447-1836

Hours:
Monday – Friday: 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Directions:
Many Supportive Care appointments are scheduled at the Southwestern Vermont Regional Cancer Center. For directions to the Cancer Center, click here.

Parking:
For Supportive Care appointments, park in parking areas F or G.


Serious illness can put a lot of stress on you and your family. It can affect every part of your life. If you have a life-threatening illness, Southwestern Vermont Health Care’s Supportive Care program can help.

Also called palliative care, supportive care focuses on patients and families from every perspective: physical, emotional, social, and spiritual. It connects patients with the resources they need and minimizes the disruption of life from illness or treatment. It anticipates, prevents, and treats suffering and pain and improves quality of life.

At SVMC, Supportive Care starts at diagnosis. The Supportive Care team steps in to make sure patients and their loved ones are aware of all the resources and measures available to improve quality of life for all.

Team members are available to meet with patients and family members in a variety of settings including the hospital, a specialist’s office, the patient’s home, a rehabilitation center, or nursing home.

From helping patients manage their symptoms and make informed choices regarding treatment options, to helping family members adjust to changes to daily living and finding emotional and spiritual support, our team is there for you throughout your treatment.

The Supportive Care services include these and more:

  • Talking with the doctors involved with your care and holding family meetings to clarify treatment options. 
  • Treating the symptoms of your condition and treatment, including pain, shortness of breath, anxiety, nausea, and constipation. 
  • Helping you make decisions about the goals of your care, including feeding tubes, breathing machines, and CPR. 
  • Helping you and your family cope with changes in daily activities and get the needed support, including home health nurses and hospice (if appropriate and if desired). 
  • Assisting with emotional and spiritual needs during a prolonged or stressful illness.

If you think you could use Supportive Care to manage a serious illness, ask your primary care provider or specialist for a referral.