Walk for the Health of It

Join Southwestern Vermont Medical Center Cardiac Rehab and Wellness Connection staff at the 23rd annual Heart Hike & Wellness Walk on Saturday, June 9. Registration at 9:30 a.m. is on the lawn of the Bennington Elks Lodge, Washington Avenue. The event is free and open to the public. The walks begin at 10 a.m. and consist of half-mile, one-, two- or three-mile lengths.

Walking is a type of cardiovascular exercise and research shows that exercise makes your heart, lungs, and muscles work more efficiently. Walking like other exercises can help you achieve a number of important health benefits. For example, help lower your blood pressure. High blood pressure can increase a person’s chance of developing heart disease, having a stroke, or experiencing other serious health conditions. Including physical activity in your daily routine can also help manage your weight, stay fit and strong, and reduce stress and tension.

When you participate in regular exercise, you should take the time to prepare yourself to prevent possible injury such as blisters or muscle pain. Be sure to wear a comfortable pair of shoes. Having a shoe that fits properly is crucial to enjoying your physical activity. Wear comfortable clothing and plan to bring a lightweight jacket depending on the weather.

Here in the Cardiac Rehabilitation Department at Southwestern Vermont Medical Center (SVMC), we see firsthand how powerful the support of another person can be for our patients. The Heart Hike is a great event that patients and families come together and show support for their loved ones.

The cardiac rehab program helps people who have heart disease recover strength and endurance through education and exercise. Please join me and other cardiac rehab staff along with Dr. Scott Rogge and Dr. Steve Anisman for this heart healthy walking event.

 

Patti Ryan is a registered nurse in the Cardiac Rehabilitation Department at Southwestern Vermont Medical Center. Visit www.svhealthcare.org to learn more about SVMC. “Health Matters” is a weekly column meant to educate readers about their personal health, public health matters, and public policy as it affects health care.